Perfect Homemade Whole Wheat Crackers

For years, I have been kind of obsessed with making crackers at home. I’m a cracker junkie, but don’t want them loaded with preservatives or corn syrup. Plus, when you buy them at the store, you get all that wasted packaging that must go into a landfill somewhere.

I have finally settled on a recipe that makes me pretty happy, but you’ll have to try it for yourself to be sure.

Here it goes:

2 1/2 cups flour (I use half whole wheat, half all-purpose—but you can adjust the ratio to your family’s preference)

2 1/2 teaspoons active dry yeast

2 tablespoons olive oil

1 teaspoon salt

1 tablespoon honey

1 cup warm water

cornmeal

kosher salt

1.) Combine all ingredients in a large bowl and let rise. I am pretty open with my time frame. I usually wait at least twenty minutes, but sometimes wait two hours. I haven’t noticed a drastic difference either way. Don’t stress out about it!

2.) Preheat oven to 450 degrees. (This makes great pizza dough—just roll it out, add your toppings of choice, and pop it in the oven for 12-15 minutes.)

cracker1

3.) Roll out dough as thin as you can get it without getting holes. I mean, really thin. It takes some practice and I still get some too thick—which results in a product more like pita bread than a cracker.

4.) Cut into cracker-esque shapes. (I use my pizza cutter.) Pierce each cracker with a fork. Transfer onto a cookie sheet dusted with cornmeal. Sprinkle with kosher salt to taste if desired. (You can also add other herbs, fresh cracked pepper, or other fun extras to make your own custom cracker flavors.)

cracker2

5.) Bake until desired level of doneness, about 7-10 minutes.

 

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  1. 12 Last Minute Local Foodie Christmas Gifts | Sustainable Kentucky - December 18, 2013

    […] Most recipes call for blending the ingredients in a food processor after you’ve made the mustard. My food processor is not the best, resulting in a very whole grain mustard that is a little weird texturally. This year, I’ve learned the magic trick, which is to grind all the mustard while it is still dry, using a mortar and pestle.  (Great tasks for the kiddos who have so much extra energy this time of year.) Soak the ground mustard in the alcohol a few hours or overnight. Then combine with remaining ingredients in a saucepan and bring to a boil. Stir constantly until the mustard reaches the desired thickness. Ladle into jars (this recipe makes about 4 8 0z. jars) and process in a boiling water bath for 10 minutes. This makes a great gift paired with yummy soft pretzels or my favorite homemade cracker recipe. […]

  2. 12 Last Minute Kentucky Foodie Gift Ideas | Sustainable Kentucky - December 18, 2013

    […] Most recipes call for blending the ingredients in a food processor after you’ve made the mustard. My food processor is not the best, resulting in a very whole grain mustard that is a little weird texturally. This year, I’ve learned the magic trick, which is to grind all the mustard while it is still dry, using a mortar and pestle.  (Great tasks for the kiddos who have so much extra energy this time of year.) Soak the ground mustard in the alcohol a few hours or overnight. Then combine with remaining ingredients in a saucepan and bring to a boil. Stir constantly until the mustard reaches the desired thickness. Ladle into jars (this recipe makes about 4 8 0z. jars) and process in a boiling water bath for 10 minutes. This makes a great gift paired with yummy soft pretzels or my favorite homemade cracker recipe. […]

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